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Investing in user experience can sometimes be a fickle matter, but really, it shouldn’t be. UX is all about making your digital product easy and intuitive for your users to complete their tasks. That’s it, that’s all.

If your product is an e-commerce site and you don’t want to make it easy for your users to buy your stuff give your head a shake.

Maybe your product is SaaS (or any software, really) and you’re in a highly competitive marketplace. Your UX may very well be your competitive advantage.

If you’re a startup with unicorn dreams, then you probably already know that the number one reason startups fail is because their product is not a perfect fit for the market.

Investing in UX makes your users lives easier, and happy users = happy pocket book.

Here are five common indicators that it’s time to invest in UX:

1. You’re getting negative user feedback
“I can’t make it work” “why is this so hard” this type of feedback is a huge glaring neon sign that something needs to change. If people can’t use your product then they won’t. It’s that simple.

2. You spend a lot of time, money, or energy on training clients how to use your product
This may not be as blatantly obvious as the feedback above, but if you need to spend significant time training your users how to use your product then it’s not an intuitive and seamless user experience.

3. Your analytics show that your users are dropping off before they finish their goal OR you have high churn OR low conversion rates
This indicates that there is something about a specific page that is tripping up your users. Analytics and metrics can hint at where the problem is but it won’t show you why users are failing. It certainly won’t tell you how to fix it.

4. You’re about to launch a new feature, design, or product
Great! I’m so happy for you! If you haven’t already asked your users about the prototype now’s the time. It’s cheaper, faster, and way less risky to work out the usability kinks on a prototype rather than on a fully launched product.

5. You didn’t include user research or feedback in your initial design
“But I did a ton of market research!” Nope. It’s not the same thing. While you’re undoubtedly learning a lot from your users during this launch, investing in formal user research will make your next launch more successful.

Ok, so what do I do about it?

You can hire some kick-ass UX designers to work on your team in-house (but be wary of who you hire), or you can hire a consultancy. What you don’t do is ignore it. Talk to an expert, tell them what you know, and they’ll ask you a ton of questions before recommending a course of action.

Good luck!

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